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What is the Troost Village Community Association?
THE TROOST VILLAGE AN INTEGRAL COMMUNITY
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Troost Folks’ is a spontaneous effort to build community in the urban core, focusing initially on the 3100 block of Troost Avenue in Kansas City, Missouri. Since 2005, a festival has been held to encourage “neighbors celebrating neighbors,” so that Troost Avenue will be a ‘meeting place’ rather than as a ‘racial dividing line’.
 
The idea of an ‘urban village’ stimulates rethinking of community. There are numerous agencies to meet the needs of disadvantaged people and there is also a sizable community of ‘movers and shakers’. We are seeking to get beyond ‘agency mentality’; while at the same time, resisting gentrification with ‘middle-class’ values.
 
Voluntary Simplicity provides the attitude that allows for an intimate community to develop beyond the usual bureaucracy that ‘takes care of people’ and also beyond the usual effort of developers that ‘takes advantage of people’. Engaged in dialogue and collaboration, self creative people are forming an entrepreneurial community with spiritual values rather than ‘struggling with’ materialism.

about

The Troost Village Community Association is the result of the evolution of a Race Relations Action Team formed during the KC Forums project in mid 2004, and the work of individuals and groups who live and work near the intersection of Troost Avenue and 31st St in Kansas City, Missouri.

Background:

In 2004 Fred Culver and Rae Petersen attended several of the KC Forums sponsored by Consensus which included the topics of Neighborhood, Regionalism, Transportation, and Race Relations in Kansas City. They chose to get involved in the extension effort through the Race Relations Action Team being facilitated by Harmony (formerly Harmony in a World of Difference) in conjunction with the Forums, and with encouragement from the vision of Human Investment section of the FOCUS Kansas City Plan.

Fred and Rae were disappointed to find only white people at the first meeting they were able to attend in August of 2004. Fortunately, just a few months before the Forums, Sr. Mary McNellis had introduced them to Fr. Paisius Altschul of St. Mary of Egypt Orthodox Church and Reconciliation Services, concerning a race study program happening at Reconciliation Services.

Fred invited Fr. Paisius (aka as Fr. David), who had been working on Troost since the 1980s, and his congregation to the Action Team, hoping that a more fruitful dialogue would result. At the October meeting we decided “shutting down Troost and having a party” would be a way to experience Troost as a meeting place rather than a dividing line.

Much to the horror of the facilitator from Harmony, the team, who fully recognized we had no money, were really “nobodies” in the city power structure, and had only 6 months to put together the “Troost Avenue Festival”, decided that shutting down Troost for one day was exactly the way to bring together all the talent and creativity we knew was there and empower the community, and fulfill the goal of KC Forums for the Action Teams of having a lasting impact on the city.

Learning to work with the organizing principle of Chaos Theory, the first Troost Avenue Festival was such a success that the team stayed together and decided we were the “Troost Folks”. The Festival became an annual event and our loose collaboration of individuals and individuals representing organizations, churches, and businesses in the midtown area. When we needed to interface with corporate and government offices we chose to be under the umbrella of n-f-p organizations with deep roots on Troost Ave.

As we approached the 6th Annual Festival the group decided it was time to undertake the incorporation step. We chose the name Troost Village Community Association.

Our regular meeting are Thursdays, 7:30pm at 3101 Troost, and are open to everyone.

The Festival was out of the pockets and “in-kind” donations of the first people who caught the possibilities of shutting down Troost and having a party to erase the racial dividing line that Troost had become over the last forty to fifty years.

Troost Folks, now organized as Troost Village Community Association, is dedicated to networking – forming ‘circles of exchange and fluid networks’ who want creative and viable community. It basically acts as an alternative think-tank for those who want to see a more positive outcome in this community. DIALOGUE, DISCOVER ORDER IN CHAOS, SYNERGY. Everyone and anyone is welcome to join and take part in group meetings, discussions and activities.

If you have any interest in this whatsoever, feel free to start attending meetings Thursday nights at 31st and Troost at 7:30 pm at the Reconciliation Services Center. Again, everyone who wants to take part is very much welcome to be a part of this.

This weird word “troost“, does it mean something??
Etymology of troost, Dutch for Holy Spirit  c.1200, from O.N. traust “help, confidence,” from P.Gmc. *traust– (cf. O.Fris. trast, Du. troost “comfort, consolation,” O.H.G. trost “trust, fidelity,” Ger. Trost “comfort, consolation,” Goth. trausti “agreement, alliance”). Related to O.E. treowian “to believe, trust,” and treowe “faithful, trusty” (see true). Meaning “businesses organized to reduce competition” is recorded from 1877. The verb (c.1225) is from O.N. treysta “to trust.” Trust-buster is recorded from 1903. Trustee in the sense of “person who is responsible for the property of another” is attested from 1653. Trustworthy is first attested 1808. etymoniine.com
Well, why is there a street named Troost in Kansas City??
Benoist Troost (1789-1859), a native of Holland, was the first resident physician in Kansas City. He, and his wife Mary Gilliss Troost, were “movers and shakers” during the 1840s and 1850s in the area of what would become Kansas City. Kansas City honored the memory of Dr. Troost by naming a street, Troost Park, located at 31st and Paseo, after him. Troost Lake, a large spring fed pond, is at 27th and Paseo.
Tell me something about Troost Avenue! (map)
Troost Avenue virtually bisects the geographic center of the city, stretching from 4th Street just south of the Missouri River to 95th St.
Troost Avenue is one of the longest and straightest of Kansas City’s major north–south thoroughfares, following what was originally an Osage trail leading to the Missouri River.
Between 31st and Linwood Blvd. Troost Ave. tops one of the city’s highest elevation points.
I’m scared to go to Troost – un-scare me.
Troost Ave has a rep. Once a Native American hunting trail, once THE street to build a mansion on, once a vibrant commercial and residential area that rivaled downtown, then abandoned and red-lined by real estate developers who essentially gobbled up productive farmland to build what is becoming the American Nightmare of seeming endless highways and cracker boxes … yeh you guys, think I should stop now?? This is something we have to address …

What is the Troost Village Community Association?
THE TROOST VILLAGE AN INTEGRAL COMMUNITY
‘Troost Folks’ is a spontaneous effort to build community in the urban core, focusing initially on the 3100 block of Troost Avenue in Kansas City, Missouri. Since 2005, a festival has been held to encourage “neighbors celebrating neighbors,” so that Troost Avenue will be a ‘meeting place’ rather than as a ‘racial dividing line’.
 
The idea of an ‘urban village’ stimulates rethinking of community. There are numerous agencies to meet the needs of disadvantaged people and there is also a sizable community of ‘movers and shakers’. We are seeking to get beyond ‘agency mentality’; while at the same time, resisting gentrification with ‘middle-class’ values.
 
Voluntary Simplicity provides the attitude that allows for an intimate community to develop beyond the usual bureaucracy that ‘takes care of people’ and also beyond the usual effort of developers that ‘takes advantage of people’. Engaged in dialogue and collaboration, self creative people are forming an entrepreneurial community with spiritual values rather than ‘struggling with’ materialism.
What is voluntary simplicity?
 
“Voluntary simplicity means doing / having / living more with less — more time, meaning, joy, satisfaction, relationships, community; less money, material possessions, stress, competition, isolation. It doesn’t mean depriving yourself; it doesn’t mean buying “cheap” and always pinching pennies; it doesn’t mean poverty. It does mean wanting what you have, and finding joy in having less; and recovering the connection with other people.”